What Surgery Means for Trans Folk, Part 1

Updated: Jul 14

We Don't Need It to be Trans, but for Some of Us, It's Euphoria

Celebrating surgery with the National Beer of Wisconsin.

When I started my trans journey, surgery (which happened for me summer of 2018) was only an option. And, in fact, that's what surgery remains for many, if not most, trans folk. Some women have penises, some men have vaginas, and genderfluid/non-binary folks feel at home in their bodies as is.

I'm not more trans for having had surgery nor is anyone the less for not getting it.

I'm not more trans for having had surgery nor is anyone the less for not getting it. Moreover, disparities in healthcare provision and access put it out of the monetary and social reach of many trans persons.


Surgery Is NOT Being Trans

Let's be clear—surgery is not one with being trans. It's an outer sign of an all-along inner reality. Surgery is no more invasively unnatural than are the ravages of puberty when testosterone or estrogen flood your body to turn you into something you never wanted to be. At least surgery has a wake-up from the nightmare; puberty is slow-torture into an endlessly torturous adulthood.


Surgery Is Not "Mutilation"

Surgery is not "mutilation" but actually a working with the wonders of the human physiognomy to align our bodily selves with our mental and emotional selves, which in persons not burdened with gender dysphoria, is always such a happy continuum that they think it the template of reality.

Now it was time for me to be me.

Surgery—A "Growing-Into"

Surgery required a "growing into" time because I didn't know what it would mean for me. I was, at best, ambivalent about my male genitalia that had